Lincolnton blacksmith keeps up practice of ancient art
Art Business

Lincolnton blacksmith keeps up practice of ancient art

Scott Beam works at his forge in Lincolnton. MICHELLE T. BERNARD Staff Writer Using the fire in a forge fed by bituminous charcoal, several different types of hammers, pliers and an anvil made in 1895, Scott Beam creates works of art out of iron at his smithy in Lincolnton. Originally, he learned how to shoe horses because he couldn’t get someone out to shoe his horses on a regular basis. From there, he got into the ancient art of blacksmithing. Blacksmithing is one of the oldest trades in the world, which most likely began in what is referred to as the “Iron Age,” when some primitive person discovered that, when exposed to high heat, some types of rock would give up a substance, iron, that would become solid when cooled. At first, simple tools were made like knives, scrapers, spearheads and arrowheads. For a long time, it remained a crude art until the science of metallurgy became understood. At one time, Lincoln County was known for its iron industry. Everything that was necessary for forging iron was here – the iron ore deposits, hardwood trees for the charcoal fuel and limestone to extract impurities from the metal and crystalline […]

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