Taking care of business: Winston-Salem native Bob Trotman critiques corporate culture in mid-career retrospective at NC State’s new art museum
Art Business

Taking care of business: Winston-Salem native Bob Trotman critiques corporate culture in mid-career retrospective at NC State’s new art museum

“Face Time,” sculpture by Bob Trotman, from “Business as Usual” T he relationship between art and business has often been a source of tension in our capitalistic society. Creative purists tend to view the business world as a corrupt domain that rewards its beneficiaries to the extent that they buy in, sell out and/or disregard ethical concerns. Financially successful artist Andy Warhol offered a provocative counterpoint to that view when he said, “Being good in business is the most fascinating art … and good business is the best art.” In his mid-career retrospective show at Raleigh’s Gregg Museum of Art and Design, artist Bob Trotman sides decisively with the purists. Titled “Business as Usual,” the exhibition stands as a scathing sendup of the business world and its leaders — upwardly mobile executives who devote their lives to the intertwined goals of financial gain and corporate status. Born and raised in Winston-Salem, Trotman gained a close-up, vicarious perspective on that world through his father, a banking executive. He saw enough of it to know that it didn’t appeal to him, so he chose to follow a very different path, pursuing goals that had little to do with money. He studied […]

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