Then and Now: Reaching for the Stars, Artists Capture and Replicate the Awe-Inspiring and the Invisible
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Then and Now: Reaching for the Stars, Artists Capture and Replicate the Awe-Inspiring and the Invisible

Hiroshi Sugimoto, Atlantic Ocean, Newfoundland, 1982. ©HIROSHI SUGIMOTO/COURTESY FRAENKEL GALLERY, SAN FRANCISCO From George Inness, who “translates just the light and feeling of a fixed hour,” to Vincent van Gogh, whose cypresses are like “voices of aspiration, joy or fear,” to Jackson Pollock, who, Robert Rosenblum wrote, “evokes the sublime mysteries of nature’s untamable forces,” artists continually try to capture and replicate the awe-inspiring and the invisible. On the occasion of the show “Beyond Stars: The Mystical Landscape” at Paris’s Musée d’Orsay (March 14–June 25), we perused ARTnews articles from 1911 to 2015, and found the yearning for the spiritual not only among traditional landscapists but also among contemporary artists such as Anselm Kiefer, Bill Viola, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Rachel Rose. All pursue enlightenment in the transcendent. March 4, 1911 That which is remarkable above everything else in the art of George Inness is the skill with which he perceives and translates just the light and feeling of a fixed hour. He makes the spectator share with him the glory of the sunset, the pearly tints of dawn, the sentiment of twilight, and the gloom and awe of the approaching tempest in the American countryside. —“Important Landscapes by George […]

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