Tom Wolfe, Sharp-Eyed Observer of the Art World, Dies at 88
Art Business

Tom Wolfe, Sharp-Eyed Observer of the Art World, Dies at 88

Tom Wolfe. Tom Wolfe, the writer famous for his stylish analyses of various cultural phenomena, died yesterday at 88, according to the New York Times . Wolfe had, over the course of his career, made major contributions to the field of journalism and literature, writing such important books as the novel Bonfire of the Vanities (1987), a gimlet-eyed takedown of upper-class New York society, and The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (1968), a nonfiction book that contended with hippie culture during the ’60s. He also penned one of the most important art books of the 20th century: The Painted Word (1975), an essential tome that argued that, in the transition between modernism and what would ultimately be called postmodernism, during the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s, a group of critics had made it so that artworks mattered less than the texts that were produced surrounding them. Words, in his view, became more important than objects. Here is one of the book’s most excoriating passages, from its introduction: All these years I, like so many others, had stood in front of a thousand, two thousand, God-knows-how-many thousand Pollocks, de Koonings, Newmans, Nolands, Rothkos, Rauschenbergs, Judds, Johnses, Olitskis, Louises, Stills, Franz Klines, Frankenthalers, […]

Tags

OrangeniusInc Tweets