Artist Cady Noland Refuses to Give Up Her Legal Fight Over the Restoration of Her Disavowed Log Cabin Sculpture
Art Law

Artist Cady Noland Refuses to Give Up Her Legal Fight Over the Restoration of Her Disavowed Log Cabin Sculpture

Cady Noland, Log Cabin (1990). Image via PACER Is it possible to conserve an artwork so much that it becomes something entirely different? And can you sue someone for such an act? These questions have been put before a federal judge for the third time by the artist Cady Noland, who has filed an appeal in an ongoing dispute over her sculpture Log Cabin (1990). Noland argues that the restoration of the work was so extreme that it amounted to the creation of an unauthorized copy of the original. A judge dismissed her lawsuit on March 8, but gave the artist the chance to replead her case one final time. The recent ruling found that Noland—one of the most elusive and sought-after American artists working today—could not sue under the US Copyright Act because the restoration of the altered work took place in Germany. “Noland does not allege any domestic act of infringement,” wrote Judge J. Paul Oetken. News of the lawsuit’s dismissal was reported earlier this month by the Art Law Blog , but there have been multiple filings in recent months, including the third version of Noland’s complaint and a new motion to dismiss from the case’s […]

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