Artist, researcher displays Newfoundland's connections to slave trade
Art Business

Artist, researcher displays Newfoundland’s connections to slave trade

Artist Camille Turner’s Afronautic Research Lab, now installed at the Bonavista Biennale in Bonavista, N.L., is shining a light on a dark corner of Newfoundland’s history — slave ships that were built on the island during the 1700s. Turner is seen in an undated still image taken from a video installation, in Bonavista, Newfoundland and Labrador. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Camille Turner, ** ST. JOHN’S, N.L. — An art installation at this year’s Bonavista Biennale is shining a light on a dark corner of Newfoundland’s history — slave ships that were built on the island during the 1700s. Camille Turner, a Toronto-based artist and academic, was intrigued when she heard the largely untold story of Newfoundland-built slave ships, and she was surprised to find so many ships documented in a database of expeditions. Her installation laid out in the historic saltbox Mockbeggar Plantation Fish Store in Bonavista, N.L., includes a display of 19 cards, each commemorating a slave ship built in Newfoundland. "I didn’t expect to see this at all," Turner said of the number of ships. "That was really quite something." Turner’s travelling Afronautic Research Lab, on display until Sept. 15., functions as a reading room on Canada’s links to […]

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