Drawing the line between works of art and their problematic creators in curriculum
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Drawing the line between works of art and their problematic creators in curriculum

Buy Photos Various controversial artists have contributed to the separating the art from the artist debate. Content warning: This article discusses sexual assault and sexual misconduct. * * * Jack Brownlee recalls reading Geoffrey Chaucer’s "The Canterbury Tales" in his British literature class. Over a year after being killed by a security guard, DeAndre Ballard is not forgotten ‘It’s time for fair maps in North Carolina’: Discussion continues on state district lines Brownlee, a sophomore, learned about how the poet is famous for his innovative storytelling and his influence on modern English, and how he is widely regarded as the “Father of English literature.” But he also learned about Chaucer’s personal history of a possible sexual assault. A legal document from 1380 releases Chaucer from charges of "raptus." Scholars still debate what specific offense the Latin word refers to, but it’s possible that the influential poet, who occasionally wrote about sexual assault in his work, was a rapist. “At the end of the class, we discussed, ‘Should we still teach Chaucer?,’” Brownlee said. “And my thoughts of the topic … (were) ‘Should we still show and analyze Polanski and Woody Allen and Weinstein films?’" Brownlee thinks the answer is […]

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