Hiroshi Sugimoto Has Hard Thoughts and a Soft Focus
Photography

Hiroshi Sugimoto Has Hard Thoughts and a Soft Focus

Jesse Dittmar for The New York Times Of all contemporary photographers, none has so rigorously explored the nature of his medium as Hiroshi Sugimoto. Since the mid-1970s, and working exclusively in black and white, he has devoted series of images to natural history dioramas, the interiors of movie palaces lighted only by their uncanny glowing screens and the historic personages of Madame Tussauds wax museum. His photographs have stretched and reshaped the concepts of time, space and light endemic to the medium, and in the process they have altered our grasp of history, visual perception and existence itself. He has anointed fossils “the pre-photography time-recording device” and called photography “a process of making fossils out of the present.” About two decades ago, Mr. Sugimoto turned to photographing iconic, mostly modernist buildings (the exception: the Temple of Dendur at the Metropolitan Museum of Art) and two years ago inaugurated a building of his own design, his idiosyncratic Odawara Art Foundation Enoura Observatory perched above Sagami Bay in eastern Japan. This month brings the publication of “Hiroshi Sugimoto: Architecture,” many of whose 100 images have never been published before, including two of the Enoura Observatory. Roberta Smith, co-chief art critic of […]

OrangeniusInc Tweets