New York's High Line park marks 10 years of transformation
Art Business

New York’s High Line park marks 10 years of transformation

When the High Line park opened in New York City, then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg predicted the transformation of the abandoned, elevated freight line into an artsy public promenade would be "an extraordinary gift to our city’s future." A decade later, there’s no question the High Line has been a resounding success as an engine for tourism and neighborhood revitalization. An estimated 8 million annual visitors now visit the park, which threads 1.5 miles (2.4 kilometers) through a transformed part of Manhattan. Once a land of industrial buildings, parking lots and auto repair businesses, the neighborhood is now anchored at one end by the dazzling new home of the Whitney Museum of American Art and at the other by Hudson Yards, a $25 billion development of skyscrapers, shops and a performing arts center. Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade balloons inflate ahead of windy, chilly holiday But there’s handwringing about whether the High Line is a victim of its own success. In the beginning, the park was remarkable for its ability to lift visitors above the streetscape to a perch with unique vistas over mostly low-rise rooftops. It was a park in the sky. Now, it’s nestled in a canyon of tall, luxury […]

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